Archive for the ‘Dog Breeds’ Category

The Fighting Truth About Pit Bulls

February 7, 2014
Cute Pit Bull

I Love a Pit Bull Smile

I’ve had a number of dogs of various breeds  in my life. One special dog was a Pit Bull/Mastiff named Squash (because of his orange color). His previous owners kept him in the back yard tied with a thick and short chain around the tree. When they moved, they just left him there. So my mom took him in. Squash understandably had a few issues due to his life tied around that tree, but with care and understanding he turned out to be a great family dog. I remember walking him as a girl and everyone being afraid of him. Some people couldn’t believe my mom would let me and my little sister be around such a big, strong, and mean-looking dog. But Squash would never hurt us. Because of his sweet nature, he was one of the most memorable dogs of my childhood.

pit bull terrier puppy

This isn’t a photo of Squash, but you get what I mean about the orange color.

With that being said, let me present to you this article about Pit Bulls. This is an article written by Randi Adams. Randi is a blog-from-home mother of three from California.

It’s easy to see golden retrievers adored as loving, family-oriented companions or chihuahuas as cute accessories that are dressed up and toted around. It’s called breed generalization, and pit bulls are victims of sweeping unfair generalizations such as “dangerous,” “a community menace” and “unpredictably aggressive.” Dog stereotypes and breed generations do originate though somewhere, somehow. Media attention that sensationalizes a tragic story involving a pit bull, or even the Michael Vick illegal dog fighting case disservice the breed that typically has a good nature.

The Fighting Truth

Pit bulls have been historically bred to be a fighting dog, and as a physically powerful, “high drive” breed, they have been traditionally trained to be an aggressive threat against other animals, as the ASPCA reveals. Because of the breed’s long history with fighting, the pit bull has a naturally strong propensity to react to other dogs. Pets for Patriots emphasizes that dog breeds of all kinds can exert aggressive behaviors, but a pit bull can end up inflicting more serious injuries and damage because of its size and strength.

Dog fighting was certainly more common one hundred years ago, and the American Pit Bull Terrier was bred to be a friendly and gentle dog, explains Pets for Patriots. At one time, the pit bull was one of the most popular dogs for American families. The pit bull image was even represented on World War One posters as a symbol for bravery and reliability.

Human Fault

ASPCA, the non-profit organization dedicated to the prevention of animal cruelty, asks “why the bad rap?” First, pit bulls can be a macho status symbol because of their intimidating appearance. Breeders irresponsibly and carelessly breed pit bull puppies for people who excite over the pit bull’s tough image. Dog owners also have their fair share in perpetuating the pit bull reputation. Dog owners may encourage the negative pit bull archetype by raising their puppy to be aggressive and domineering.

Just like humans can reinforce the violent association of pit bulls by using their pet as a tough guy accessory, humans can also negate the fear of pit bulls. The ASPCA describes the breed as “one of the most delightful, intelligent and gentle dogs imaginable.” Like all dog breeds, the dog just needs to be well-bred, socialized and trained. Despite the pit bull’s connection to dog fighting, pit bulls make good dogs for therapy and search-and-rescue. A pit bull puppy can grow to be a well-mannered, beloved member of the family, loyal to their owners. It’s just the owners responsibility to provide consistent training, gentle guidance and good socialization with humans and other animals when the puppy is as young as seven weeks old. A pit bull also needs healthy living conditions, adequate exercise and room to roam. A pet door, for instance, can provide a dog with the independence for exerting excess energy, as PetSafe mentions.

Myths Debunked

Any pit bull lover and advocate will tell you the following:

  • Pit bulls have strong jaw muscles and a determined hold, but definitely not locking jaws.
  • A dog with aggressive behaviors toward other dogs is no more likely to be aggressive toward humans – pit bull or not.
  • Pit bulls are easygoing dogs, but shouldn’t be unsupervised around other animals.
  • Not all pit bulls are meant to socialize at the dog park. Pitt bulls are muscular and high-energy dogs that can get overwhelmed in a dog park environment.
  • Owners who spay or neuter their pit bull can improve their dog’s health and behavior, as well as prevent unwanted, homeless pit bulls. Learn more about spay-neuter surgeries and other frequently asked questions by visiting our Spay/Neuter FAQs page.

There it is, that’s the article. What do you all think? I agree with most of it, although I’m not too sure about some of those myths. How many of you have Pit Bulls who do just fine around other animals? What about the dog park situation? Thanks for weighing in.

I Love Mutts

September 21, 2013
My Dog Pierson is a Poo Poo Head

Mutt Extraordinaire!

Flea with Jones Natural Chews showed a great video on her Funny Bone Monday post. This is post #40. The video is about how a dog rescue group uses the originality of mutts as their pitch to get people interested in adopting them. I thought this was a fun idea.

I have decided that Pierson is either a Fluffy-tailed Border Aussie or a Black & White Collaussie. Sephi, who has passed on over the Rainbow Bridge, was part Chow and possibly also part Shepherd, Labrador, and Border Collie. So perhaps she could have been called a Black Chinese Labrashep. What do you think your mutt breed could be?

Speaking of mutts, DogLeaderMysteries.com has a contest for the best looking mutt in the world. Go visit her blog and enter your mutt. Mutts unite!

What it is Like to Have a Labrador Retriever

November 3, 2012

Maya playing with one of her Kong dog toys.

Everyone once in a while I will write about a specific dog breed. The information is helpful and informative, but it can be a little dry. So I am going to do something a little different today. I am not just going to tell you about a specific dog breed, I am going to tell you about a specific dog. This very special dog is a Labrador Retriever and she is my Maya.

The Dog House event had a fun photo shoot where you could dress up your dog. Maya looks like the little clown that she is.

Very Affectionate
While Maya does fit into the general characteristic mold of a Labrador Retriever, she is unique in her own way. Unlike most Labradors, she is not overly needy for affection. Oh, don’t get me wrong, she loves attention. But she doesn’t beg for it. Perhaps this is because I work from home and give her plenty of love and attention. But even when I was away from home working in an office all day, she didn’t cause any trouble while I was gone. When I came home, she was excited and we would play then go for a walk. Then for the rest of the evening she was quiet and content with laying down beside me on the couch or at my feet.

Maya is a great cuddler.

Can be Hardheaded
I’ve heard Labradors can be hardheaded, but I just don’t see that trait in Maya; not even an ounce of it. Maya is my first purebred Lab so I am not sure what the Barron’s Dog Breed Bible means when they say Labs can be hardheaded. I know what hardheaded means. Sephi could be stubborn at times. But I just don’t see how it could apply to a dog like Maya. Perhaps Barron’s meant something else. Or perhaps they are wrong. Do any of you have a Labrador and can explain to me what Barron’s might be referring to?

Maya Wearing Daisy Diva Design Collar.

Virtually Non-Aggressive
Maya is the most amiable dog I have ever had. Every single dog I’ve had before Maya has been disagreeable in some way, whether with dog aggression, shy with people, or guard-dog qualities. Maya, however, loves everybody and every dog. One could be an ax-murderer and she would love them. I feel bad for her sometimes because she tends to be bullied by other dogs. Pierson can be a pest when playing with her but she just stands there and takes it, even if he is hurting her.

Maya always let Sephi win.

Excitable
Right now Maya is laying at my feet, as quiet as ever. But say the words “walk”, “cookie”, or “outside” and I have a maniac on my hand. Goodness-forbid if someone comes over to the house. I have managed to get Maya to sit and stay while I answer my door or open the closet door for her food or her leash. But she whines impatiently and wiggles around so much that I question whether she is really obeying the stay command. And despite the fact that I have taught Maya not to jump on me or others, in her excitement she often forgets herself. At Dogtoberfest this year, she tried to jump on a lady who was petting her and ended up giving her a fat lip! Walks can be a nightmare too, especially when she sees another person or dog. She is getting much better, but she still has those moments when she is so excited that she pulls and barks.

Pull No More dog harness

Maya Wearing Her New Pull No More Dog Harness.

Intelligent
Maya is a very smart girl. She is not as smart as my dog Pierson but she is definitely smarter than my dog Sephi was. It doesn’t take long to teach her new tricks. If anything inhibits her training, it is her excitability. I have to keep training sessions short because if she gets too excited about doing tricks for treats, she stops listening and starts doing tricks at random until she finally does the one I asked for. When I try to get her to jump through the hula-hoop, like I taught Pierson, she jumps up but not through, thereby landing onto the hoop. She gets so excited about jumping that she doesn’t understand the concept of what she is supposed to do.

“I will do anything for a treat!”

Loves Water
The first time Maya saw a body of water, she ran so fast into the water that before I knew it, she was underwater, head and all. For a split second, I was worried I would have to rescue her. But she came out coughing, then jumped right back in and played for at least an hour. Check out this great video of Maya swimming at a public pool. Notice that a lot of the other dogs in the pool are also Labradors.

So there you have it. Information on the Labrador Retriever presented by my sweet, excitable, intelligent Maya. What is your Labrador like?

Here’s another great Lab – Callie.

The Mountain Labrador Collage Dogs Adult Tee T-shirt

This and other great Labrador gifts at our Amazon a-store, Labrador Retrievers Gift Store.

The Trouble with Smart Dogs

September 8, 2012

I’m cute and a lot of fun but I can be trouble if I get bored.

I read a great article on WayCoolDogs.com about how smart dogs can be a lot of work. Many people are drawn to smart dogs because of all the things they daydream a smart dog could do for them that an average dog can’t. Seriously, we see those assistance dogs, police dogs, or agility dogs that can do all sorts of cool things and we think, “Wow! I wish I could have a dog like that.” But we really don’t know what we might be getting ourselves into.

Who wouldn’t want a dog that could learn to open the fridge and get us a beer on command? Neat trick, right? But do we really want a dog that can figure out how to open the fridge? It won’t be long before this really cool dog could be helping himself to other things in the fridge. And a smart dog like that might figure out how to open other things, like cupboards or even your front door.

I have a smart dog. Actually, I have two smart dogs. It is not enough that I need to take them for regular walks. I need to keep them entertained as well or they might cause trouble. Well, actually only one dog might. Maya can be a bit of a couch potato. But Pierson is constantly looking for stuff to do. I could take him for an hour walk and play fetch with him for another hour and it will still not be enough. So how can I keep him out of trouble?

Besides regular exercise, my smart dog needs regular training, thinking games, and work. Pierson is an Aussie/Border Collie mix. This breed is designed to be active, alert, and intelligent. He is constantly on guard. He listens for strange noises and barks at them. He is a barker. And he patrols the yard for pesky rabbits. These things are his “job” in a sense, although I’d prefer he didn’t do them. I dread the day he actually catches and kills a rabbit. :(

Pierson also partakes in regular training. I’ve had him eight months now and he already knows every trick Maya knows plus one or two more. Most tricks are easy, but now we need to start working on things more complex. He loves to learn and I try to take advantage of that as much as possible.

Pierson likes to play games too. We play hide-and-seek sometimes. I hide and he tries to find me. He is getting better at it. And he is learning the “Find It” game (mentioned last month). Other games we play are fetch, he is learning to catch a frisbee, and one of these days I’d like to teach him agility.

Having a smart dog is fantastic. I’m so proud of how smart my boy Pierson is. But he is also a lot of work. What would he be like if I didn’t spend so much time exercising, training, and playing with him? Well, he might learn to help himself to the cupboards or fridge. He might decide that chewing my stuff is entertaining. He might make a game out of taking my things and hiding them. Or he could decide that he needs to take the rabbit hunting to the next level and dig out of the yard to track them down.

There is a lot to consider before getting a new pet. How intelligent they are and how much time you have to dedicate to them is one of those factors. If you are considering a smart dog check out this article from WayCoolDogs.com called, “Beware the Smart Dog“.

The Corgi Dog Breed – Part II: Differences between the Cardigan and Pembroke

August 4, 2012

Last Saturday we talked about the similarities of the Pembroke Welsh Corgi and the Cardigan Welsh Corgi. Although these breeds both came from central Europe and into Wales, they developed into two distinct breeds over time. The Cardigan became more specialized in Cardiganshire while the Pembroke developed separately in Pembrokeshire, hence their breed names. But the differences don’t just lie in their place of origin. There are distinct physical characteristics and subtle differences in temperament.

Subtle Differences in Personality
We say subtle differences in temperament because the differences are so slight that they may not be noticeable. In general, the Pembroke Welsh Corgi may be more affectionate. They tend to like people a little bit more including strangers and so may not make as good guard dogs.

Physical Differences – Body and Face
Although the Cardigan and Pembroke can stand at about the same height, the Cardigan Welsh Corgi can be a little heavier. The Pembroke’s body and facial features tend to be a bit leaner. Both have a fox-like face, but the Pembroke’s head is even more foxy in appearance. The eyes of the Cardigan are medium to large whereas the Pembroke’s are generally just medium-sized and more oval in shape. Both dog breeds have erect ears but the ears of the Cardigan are more rounded while the Pembroke’s are more pointed.

Physical Differences – Tail, Feet, and Colors
Probably the most notable difference is the tail. The Pembroke’s tail is docked and the Cardigan’s is not. The Cardigan’s tail is medium in length and carried low. The feet of the two Corgi types are different too. The Cardigan has round feet and his front feet are pointing slightly outward. The Pembroke has oval feet and slightly longer toes. His front feet are straight but his front legs may be turned slightly inward. The color of the Corgi’s can give away which type too. Both can be a solid color such as red or sable with white flashings. But the Cardigan can also be bridle or blue merle with white flashings.

Health and History
Both breeds have a tendency towards genetic disorders such as hip dysplasia and degenerative myelopathy. But the Pembroke is also prone to intervertebral disc disease and epilepsy. It may be because the Pembroke is more popular, and therefore the most overbred. The Pembroke was a favorite of King George VI and Queen Elizabeth II, so it was especially popular in Britain. They might be even more popular after Queen Elizabeth’s Corgi’s stole the show in the grand opening of the 2012 Olympics in London (as seen on Dogster).

If you are considering getting a Corgi as a pet, be sure to research the breeder thoroughly or go through a Corgi rescue group. Read up on Corgi’s with a book from Barron’s HERE. Barron’s provides lots of tips for choosing, training, and keeping a Corgi healthy.

Do you have a Corgi or know someone who has one? Tell us about him or her. Is there any characteristic that we missed?

Welsh Corgis: Pembroke and Cardigan (Barron's Complete Pet Owner's Manuals) Rikki KnightTM Welsh Corgi Dog Design Messenger Bag - Book Bag - Unisex - Ideal Gift for all occassions!                 

The Corgi Dog Breed – Part I: General Characteristics

July 28, 2012

Cardigan Welsh Corgi

For a smallish happy fun-loving dog breed, check out the Corgi. There are two types of Corgis, the Cardigan Welsh Corgi and the Pembroke Welsh Corgi. These two dog breeds are similar in many ways. In fact, they were once considered as one breed by kennel clubs and were often interbred. But there are some distinct differences. Before we get into how they are different, check out how they are similar.

Pembroke Welsh Corgi

Cattle Drovers not Herders
Corgis were Welsh cattle drovers brought to central Europe centuries ago. They were further developed in South Wales (Cardiganshire and Pembrokeshire). The Corgi didn’t really herd the cattle but drove or scattered them. Why would the Welsh want to drive their cattle? Because the land was owned by the Crown and the only way the Welsh could use it was for their cattle. So the further afield a herd could go the more land the Welsh could use.

General Physical Characteristics
Corgis are short-legged dogs with a compact body. They stand relatively at the same height of about 10-12 inches (Cardigan up to 12.5 inches). They have a flat skull that is wide between the medium-sized erect ears. They have a harsh coat which is straight, fairly short, and dense. This coat needs brushing at least once a week.

General Personality Traits
The Corgi dog breed may tend to bark a lot. Even though they bark, they can be relatively friendly with strangers. They are moderately active dogs which need daily exercise. They are somewhat playful, affectionate, can be good with children, and generally get along well with other pets. Both Corgi dog breeds are intelligent and easy to train.

Next week, find out how the Cardigan Welsh Corgi is different from the Pembroke Welsh Corgi. In the meantime, check out our Corgi Dog Breed Gift Store from Amazon which includes some of the great gifts shown below:

Corgi Cotton Ladies Socks Dogs Corgi - Pembroke Welsh Corgi - Mugs

Book Review – Labrador Retrievers: How to Be Your Dog’s Best Friend

July 21, 2012

“Puppies and adults both are happy dogs with constantly wagging tails and a fast tongue.”

As pet blogger and proud owner of a Labrador Retriever, I was given the opportunity to preview this e-book titled “Labrador Retrievers: How to Be Your Dog’s Best Friend“. Although I wasn’t able to see the images in my free preview version, I found the content quite comprehensive. If you are considering getting a Labrador Retriever, everything you want to know about them is this e-book and available on Amazon.com at a very low price.

Chapter one on the history of Labradors is brief. Chapter 2 was about where to get a Labrador Retriever. It was my favorite chapter because the author, Lorie Huston DVM, cautions against buying one from a pet store and gives some great information on how to find a good dog breeder or rescue group.

The next five chapters cover how to prepare your house for a Labrador, what to buy for him, basic training, socializing, care tips including some great feeding tips, and veterinary visits. One piece of advice which I found uncommon is that she recommends bringing your new dog home in a carrier or dog seat belt! Labradors can be a handful. Not only can a dog seat belt help keep your new pet safe, but it can also help keep them from being a distraction to the driver.

In the chapter on basic training, Lorie Huston DVM not only covers the basics, but training on some behavior issues as well such as separation anxiety. In the chapter on training, she does not promote one training method over another but does stress against the use of dominance training techniques and even gives a very good explanation as to why.

I really enjoyed the chapter on caring for a Labrador because it has great information on how to find the right food. It also has some good general proportion feeding tips since Labradors have a tendency to get overweight. Other care tips include grooming, bathing, trimming nails, cleaning ears, brushing teeth, and what to look for in signs of illness or disease. Veterinary care tips include vaccinations, how to prevent pest problems (like fleas, ticks, and heartworms), the benefits of spaying/neutering, how to handle some pet emergencies, and so on.

Since the author is a DVM, you know she has the expertise to share about dogs. I myself have a Labrador, my girl Maya who was adopted, and can attest that the information in this e-book is very comprehensive and perfect for anyone wanting to get a Labrador. By the time I got to the 2nd page of the book, I read the following, “Puppies and adults both are happy dogs with constantly wagging tails and a fast tongue.” When I read this sentence, my confidence in the author’s knowledge was firmly established. It describes my Labrador to a T.

You can get “Labrador Retrievers: How to Be Your Dog’s Best Friend” as an e-book on Amazon for just $2.99. If you don’t have a Kindle, you can download the Kindle for PC on Amazon for free and read it on your computer. You can also enter a contest to win a free copy by visiting WOW! Women on Writing website – click HERE.

Author, Lorie Huston, DVM

Dogs of the World – The New Guinea Singing Dog

June 23, 2012

This is such a cool-looking and cool-sounding dog. I first heard about the New Guinea Singing Dog when I was doing an art collage on dogs from around the world (you know, like the Scottish Terrier, the Afghan Hound, the Japanese Chin).

The New Guinea Singing Dog looks a lot like the Dingo. He has relatively the same build and a distinctive red coat. The few differences are that he generally has more white on his feet, face, and chest. And sometimes he has a little bit of black, or darkening, on his cheeks and/or muzzle.

This is a very old dog breed. In its native land, he might live as a wild scavenger dog or as a pet. Many are kept in zoos. You might see some in zoos here in the US.

So why is he called a singing dog? Well, he has a very distinctive sing-song howl. Here is a video of one singing.

My two sources for information on this dog breed is “The New Encyclopedia of the Dog” by Bruce Fogle and Wikipedia.

The New Encyclopedia of the Dog

Dog Breed Feature Part IV – How to Get a Healthy Pug

June 9, 2012

Pugs are wonderful dogs but they have a tendency towards a number of genetic health issues. Many of those issues are related to their short noses. If you are looking to get a Pug dog breed, you should know what some of the common health problems are and how to decrease the chances of your Pug having them.

Health Concerns Related to Dogs with Short Noses
Brachycephalic syndrome covers a number of more specific respiratory issues including the soft palate being abnormally long and/or the nostrils being too small for the dog to breathe properly. The issues can be as minor as only causing your dog to make noise when he breathes. But sometimes the issue can be severe enough to require surgery. Even if your Pug doesn’t have these health concerns in severity, it is important to remember that their short noses make it so that they can’t tolerate heat as well as longer-nosed dogs.

Other Health Concerns
Some dogs may develop Pug dog encephalitis which is a genetic disorder where their brain gets severely inflamed. Symptoms include seizures, abnormal gait, blindness, and even death. Two common eye disorders in Pugs include progressive retinal atrophy (PRA) and pigmentary keratitis. In PRA the retina gradually deteriorates while in pigmentary keratitis the retina develops dark scar tissue which eventually covers the entire eye, both which can eventually lead to blindness. Pugs also experience three common skeletal issues including hip dysplasia, patellar luxation (knee caps), and Legg-Perthes disease (femur hip bone).

How to Get a Healthy Pug
The Barron’s “Pugs: A Complete Pet Owner’s Manual” has some very good advice on how to shop for a quality Pug dog breed. They address breeders, pet shops, animal shelters, and breed rescue clubs. One very good point they made is, “In general, the smaller the “kennel” the more friendly the puppies it will produce and the more healthy those puppies will be.” So don’t go to pet shops. Visit the breeders in person at their location. The breeders should be providing certain health guarantees which last longer than a year (especially since some issues may not become evident until after several years). Good breeders will have done a number of tests and will willingly provide you with proof. Read up on the common health issues previously listed and determine which tests the breeder should have done.

This is our final article on the wonderful Pug dog breed. If you missed the others, check out Parts I, II, and III. Part I talks about the history of the word ‘pug’. Part II is the history of the dog breed itself. And Part III is about the physical and behavioral traits of Pugs. Check out those posts, all written in May 2012, and check out our All Things Pug Store by clicking HERE or one of the pictures below.

Pugs (Complete Pet Owner's Manual) Pug Double-Walled Eco Plastic Drinking Cups 16 oz - Set of Two

Webkinz Smaller Signature Pug

Dog Breed Feature Part III – The Pug “Multum in Parvo”

June 2, 2012

A lot of dog in a little space. That is the meaning of the Latin phrase, “Multum in Parvo”, used to describe the Pug dog breed. Last week you learned the history of the Pug, but now we are going to tell you what he looks like and why this small breed is a lot of dog.

Description of the Pug Dog Breed
The Pug Coat
A Pug’s coat is short and smooth. It is either all black or it is silver or apricot-fawn with a black mask, muzzle, ears, cheek moles, and trace down the back. This light colored body with a black face strongly resembles the colors of the fawn or apricot Mastiff. Because the coat is short, it requires minimal brushing. The Pug’s wrinkled face, however, requires regular cleaning, especially between wrinkles.

The Pug Size
The Pug dog breed stands about 10 to 11 inches tall and should weigh between 14 and 18 pounds. Yes, he is a small dog. But it is his personality which makes him ‘Multum in Parvo”.

Physical Pug Traits
The Pug’s body is square. His legs are moderate in length and proportionate to his cobby body. His chest is wide and rib-cage round. The Pug has a small short tail curled tightly over his back. The Pug’s head is round, and proportionately large as compared to his compact body. He has small thin ears described as either rose or button. His jaw is undershot and his muzzle is short and square. The muzzle should not be turned upward. Because of the short muzzle, Pugs do not do well in the heat. Please note that a few of the health concerns for a Pug (next week’s article) are due to the short muzzle. The Pug’s eyes are round and prominent. They should be dark in color yet bright and eager.

The Pug Temperament
Barron’s “The Dog Breed Bible” describes the Pug’s personality as “a blend of dignity and comedy”. They are loyal and have a zest for life which has earned them the Latin motto, “Multum in Parvo”. They can be as brave as a terrier when it comes to ‘playing with the big dogs’ but otherwise get along well with other pets. They are generally good with children too, but may take a bit to warm up to strangers.

Pugs can be very affectionate and playful. For a small dog, his energy level is average and requires a short walk daily or a fun play session. Sometimes the Pug can be stubborn but he is generally eager to please. His amiable nature makes him easy to train if a positive reinforcement method is used. Harsher training methods may bring out his stubborn streak.

If you are considering a small dog with little shedding, minimal exercise requirements, and yet gets along in almost any family and home setting, then the Pug dog breed may be for you. Whether you live on a farm or in a small apartment, whether you have children and other pets or live alone, the Pug can bring you much laughter and companionship. He really is a lot of dog in a little space.

Come see us again next Saturday when we tell you some health concerns of the Pug, where to get one, and the best book for learning to care for and train your Pug. Also, check out our All Things Pug Gift Store by clicking HERE.

PUG dog puppy COFFEE cup TRAVEL Mug ART decor NEWPug Dog Bathroom Toilet Paper Holder NoveltyRuff Ruff and Meow Dog Hoodie, Pugs and Kisses, Black, Small


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