Archive for the ‘Dog Safety’ Category

Wordless Wednesday – Eventful Week

July 31, 2013

Something happened this past Thursday and something fun is going on this week. Thursday, Maya and I were in a minor car accident. We are both okay. You can read more about it on my other blog. The article is titled “Why My Dog Wears a Pet Car Harness“.

Car Bumper Collision Damage

My bumper will need to be replaced from the rear end collision on Thursday.

The second thing is my dad and stepmom are here from Texas for a visit!

Quilt Made By Mom

My step mom made me this beautiful quilt! This is me wrapped up in it. Yes, I am aware my hair is a mess. ;)

Dad Petting Dog Pierson

My dad petting Pierson

Parents Clover Pierson

My dad and step mom reluctantly come outside to play with dogs. That’s Clover by my dad, not Maya.

Step Mom Maya

My step mom is trying to get Maya to play.

Dad Maya Pierson

My dad is getting Maya and Pierson to do tricks for treats.

Dad Pierson Shake

Pierson shakes my dad’s hand in order to get a treat.

Dad Dogs Maya Pierson

Maya and Pierson anxiously await my dad’s command so that they can earn a treat.

Step Mom Maya Pierson Dog Trick

My step mom tries to get Maya to do a dog trick.

Also, my friend Heather came over with her dog Clover again. Pierson, my dog aggressive boy, tried to be naughty but Clover just ignored him. It all went very well.

Pierson Clover Heather

My friend heather with her dog Clover. Pierson is standing by keeping an eye on Clover. He’s still not sure what to think of her visits.

Maya Clover Pierson in Backyard

Clover is rolling around in the grass while Maya and Pierson look on. “What is this strange girl up to?” they wonder.

For more great pet photos around the dogosphere, check out the Wordless Wednesday blog hop link below.

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Review – NiteDawg Light-Up Dog Collar

March 2, 2013
NiteDawg Dog Collar

This is a Lab wearing the NiteDawg dog collar, but this is not Maya. (product image from SafetyGearOnline.com)

In today’s busy world where you get up early for work and get home late, you probably have to walk your dog when it is dark out. The darkness can be worrisome for a pedestrian, especially when crossing the street. You might see a car coming because of their headlights, but they probably won’t see you until the last moment. So what can you do to protect yourself and your pet? Try a dog collar that doesn’t just glow in the dark, but also lights up in the night.

The NiteDawg is just such a dog collar. You don’t have to wait for a vehicle’s headlights to reflect on the dog collar for the driver of the car to see it. They can see it from a distance because the collar has an LED light.

We received one of these Night Dawg dog collars to try and I really liked it. It was super easy to adjust and fit around my Labrador Maya’s neck. I simply took the light source out, cut it down to size, then put it back into the collar. It was easier than I thought it would be.

I can let Maya wear the collar all the time just like any other dog collar. Or I can put it on her just for when we go out walking at night. The NiteDawg collar has three settings for the light: off, steady-on, and flashing-on. To change the settings, I simply push a little button on the collar.

Maya Wearing NiteDawg Dog Collar

Maya is on our back porch wearing her new NiteDawg light-up dog collar.

The light runs on a battery. To replace the battery, you would have to remove four small screws on the small battery pack. The round battery is a CR2032 3V battery. A searching on Amazon shows that this battery is inexpensive – about $5 for five! By the way, the light switch is water-resistant. It’s not waterproof, so you dog can’t go swimming in it. But it should be fine if you are walking your dog in the rain.

Although I do really like this product, there are two things I don’t like. First, the rubber-like light source was bent from the packaging and is a bit warped around Maya’s neck. I’m sure that over time, the shape will become more proportionate looking. This really wasn’t a big deal, just a minor aesthetic thing. Second, you have to unscrew the case to replace the battery and the screws are really small. It can be a hassle for someone who is older… or in my case, someone who doesn’t have a screwdriver with that small of a head. Oh, I guess another thing which some may not like, the collar only comes in red.

Overall, I think the Night Dawg light-up dog collar is worth the price of about $15.00 plus shipping. It is well-made and a super-fun way to walk your dog at night. You can also use it to keep an eye on your dog when you let him out at night to go potty!

We received no monetary compensation for this post. However, we did receive the dog collar to try for free. Our review is 100% our own.

Maya's NiteDawg light-up dog collar.

It was difficult getting a good photo in the dark because it came out as a red blur on black. So I put Maya on our snowed-on front porch in front of a light source.

Wordless Wednesday – Practicing Pet Safety

January 2, 2013

I remember working in the corporate world and noticing that I had more pictures of my dogs on my desk than other people had of their children or grandchildren. So I wouldn’t be surprised if some people thought of me as the crazy dog lady. I don’t have kids so my dogs are my family (for years, it was just Sephi and I). And as such, I take care of them as well as, and sometimes better than, I take care of myself. Here are some photos to prove it:

We all eat healthy. Maya & Pierson get a good quality dog food in measured portions.

We all eat healthy. Maya & Pierson get a good quality dog food in measured portions.

I feed my dogs twice a day so that they don’t eat a large amount at one time. Eating too much at once can cause bloat, which can be deadly for dogs, especially big dogs. One thing I would like to try is a slow pet feeder dog bowl.

Pull No More dog harness

I decided to stop using retractable leads since it made Maya’s walking habits worse and because I heard a horrible story about a dog getting struck by a car because he tried to run across the street after another dog. The owner did not lock the retractable lead quickly enough. :(

Pierson has a rabies tag, the Home Again tag with his microchip number, and his id tag with my phone number.

Pierson has a rabies tag, the Home Again tag with his microchip number, and his id tag with my phone number.

Maya is wearing her Kurgo Tru-Fit dog car harness.

Maya is wearing her Kurgo Tru-Fit dog car harness.

I make sure the fenced yard is kept repaired and any dug holes are filled up.

I make sure the fenced yard is kept repaired and any dug holes are filled up.

Dougie Wearing His Dog Life Jacket

Dougie wears a dog life jacket when he is out on the water. Dougie is not my dog. Maya has one, but I don’t have a picture of her wearing it. Pierson has yet to go swimming so he doesn’t have one yet.

I keep these in my car along with pet identification cards with vet info, a blanket, water, and extra leashes.

I keep these in my car along with pet identification cards with vet info, a blanket, water, and extra leashes.

This sign goes on my car window whenever my dogs ride with me in the car. It has their photo and emergency contact information.

This sign goes on my car window whenever my dogs ride with me in the car. It has their photo and emergency contact information.

Dog toys that I know my dogs will chew to pieces are kept picked up and can only be played with under supervision.

Dog toys that I know my dogs will chew to pieces are kept picked up and can only be played with under supervision.

After I heard about a dog running with a stick in his mouth and the stick getting jammed into the back of his throat, I try really hard not to let Maya play with sticks.

After I heard about a dog running with a stick in his mouth and the stick getting jammed into the back of his throat, I try really hard not to let Maya play with sticks.

The first thing I do after a snow is shovel and de-ice the steps. These steps are the only way my dogs can get to the fenced yard and I don't want them to slip. Warm water is used when they get inside to remove the salt.

The first thing I do after a snow is shovel and de-ice the steps. These steps are the only way my dogs can get to the fenced yard and I don’t want them to slip. Warm water is used when they get inside to remove the salt.

How do you practice pet safety? Am I missing anything important?

For more Wordless Wednesday pet photos, check out our Pet Auto Safety Blog for the blog hop.

Boom! Dog Safety Tips for the 4th of July

June 30, 2012

Although my Maya is in the spirit of the 4th of July, it is still not a good idea to let her go watch the fireworks.

This is a repost of our 4th of July safety post from last year:

People love fireworks.  The colorful lights exploding in the night sky dazzles our eyes.  The explosion excites us as we thank God that we live in the United States of America.  But despite how much we love fireworks, most dogs do not like them at all.

Every year after the 4th of July the shelters get a higher volume of lost dogs.  Lost dog posters can be seen in the park and the neighborhoods.  Some dogs escape their yard as they try to run in fright from the terrible noise of the fireworks.  Many other dogs were at the park with their owners at the fireworks when they got away.  Some dogs might eventually find their way home thanks to a kind stranger or animal control, but others may never make it back.

When you go to watch fireworks this year, be sure to leave your dog safe and secure at home.  If possible, keep them in a secure area inside the house.  A dog in the back yard may jump or dig out in order to escape the noise.  Or if he is on a chain he may break the it, slip out of his collar, or hurt himself trying to break out of it.  If your dog is crate trained, keep him inside the house and inside his crate.  If he is not crate trained, keep him in a quiet room.  If possible, keep him in a room with no accessible windows – such as the bathroom.

You can also help your dog by turning on some familiar noise such as the radio or television.  And even if your dog is indoors, make sure he is wearing his collar or tags.  A desperate dog just might be able to find a way out. I have heard of dogs breaking out of windows, going through air ducts, and even managing to open an unlocked door. Tags will help to bring them home. If you find a dog this year, contact the local animal shelter and humane society. Post in the classified ads of your local newspaper. Post online too. Craig’s list is a popular place to post online. Leave fliers at local neighborhood centers and notify local residents.

If you don’t want your pet to be left out of the festivities, take your pet to the park for the 4th of July picnic.  But please leave take him home before the fireworks! Enjoy the Independence Day celebration and come home to a safe and happy pet.

Rover, Pick up All Your Dog Toys!

June 16, 2012

Maya is playing with a homemade sock toy.

If you’re like me, you buy a new dog toy at least once every couple of weeks. That is a lot of dog toys. And it is expensive too. So how can you save money and what do you do with them all?

Make Your Own Toys (Recycle)
When my dog Sephi passed on, I was left with a bunch of pet bandanas. Maya and Pierson didn’t look good in them so I gave them to someone so they could make dog toys with them instead. I got some of those toys and the rest are being sold for $1 each and each $1 gets donated to a good cause. So if you have old clothes which are not in good shape to donate, cut them up to make braided dog ropes or other dog toys. One which I like to do with old socks is put a tennis ball or even a plastic water bottle inside and tie the end.

The Old Switch-a-Roo
If you not only buy toys and make them too, you could be completely overwhelmed with toys. I find that the newer my dogs’ toys are, the more they play with them. So to keep them interested in all their toys, I let them play with new toys for a few days, put them away, then take out some older toys. Since the dogs haven’t played with the older toys in a while, they are like new! I do this with about five sets of dog toys over a monthly period.

Supervise
Be careful about letting your dog chew on certain toys when you are not home. Homemade toys are great but they can be easily ingested if your dog is allowed to tear them up. Always watch your dog when he is playing with a destructible dog toy and put it away when he is not playing with it.

A Toy Box
In order to keep yourself or other people in the household from falling and tripping over all the dog toys, put them in a dog toy box. I use an inexpensive laundry basket as a toy box. It works great and I can put it in a room where the dogs are not allowed so that they can’t take all the toys out at once and leave them all over the house.

How often do you buy your dog toys? Do you make your own dog toys too? Where do you put them all?

Blue Pearl Emergency Pet and a Pet First Aid Booklet

February 4, 2012

Blue Pearl is an emergency pet hospital with 24 locations in the United States. We hate to think about pet emergencies, but they unfortunately do happen. To handle a pet emergency it is good to have a pet first aid booklet and emergency kit available. And you should know where your nearest emergency pet hospital is located.

Thankfully, I have a pet first aid booklet from Blue Pearl and a Blue Pearl emergency pet hospital within 45 minutes of where I live. Sad to say, I have had to visit the emergency pet hospital twice in the past couple of months. Although the pet emergency was stressful, the doctors helped me feel confident in their services. They were very knowledgeable and spoke to me with compassion regarding the pet emergency care choices for my dogs. Even though my dog Persephone (Sephi for short) passed away, I am confident in the care that she had been given at Blue Pearl. Pierson was the next dog I took to the Blue Pearl emergency pet hospital and he too received great care. He is doing much better now after his emergency.

The first aid booklet I have is from Blue Pearl. It covers symptoms which indicate a pet emergency as well as some first aid action that can be taken just before you go to the emergency pet hospital. Emergency first aid covered in this booklet includes poisonings, diarrhea, seizures, a skunk recipe, and so much more.

Blue Pearl emergency pet hospital has locations in Florida, Georgia, Illinois, Kansas, Kentucky, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, New York, Tennessee, and Virginia. If you live in any of these states, visit BluePearlVet.com and ask them for a pet first aid booklet.

How To Greet a Dog and Teach Your Dog to Properly Greet

January 31, 2012

 

This is not how to greet a dog you just met.

 

We are tempted to greet strange dogs the same way we greet our own – with a high pitched voice, petting on the head, or even hugging. But if a dog doesn’t know you, he may react negatively to such a greet. The high pitched voice can be threatening, as could reaching for his head or hugging him. Children, especially, need to know how to properly greet a dog.

We found this great and informative article on Hub Pages titled “How to Meet a Dog“. Not only does the article go over the proper way to greet a dog, it also tells you how you can help your dog learn to properly greet people. My dog Maya gets super excited when she meets someone new. And as a result, she can be a bit difficult to handle and very intimidating to someone who doesn’t know dogs very well. The information I learned on the article, “How to Meet a Dog” has been very helpful.

Check out Hub Pages for the article “How to Meet a Dog” and other great articles. Hub Pages has a great community of pet lovers who share their expertise on dogs and other animals.

Beware of Frozen Ponds

December 27, 2011

Every year, people and their pets die from falling into a frozen pond. A pond may look frozen, but don’t take a chance. Don’t walk on a frozen pond, lake, or stream. And don’t let your dog run loose around a frozen body of water.

Below are a couple of articles about dogs being rescued from frozen ponds. The video above is from the second article from The Daily Tail. This is a video of a dog being rescued from a frozen pond. Luckily, he was a Pyrenees dog breed with a thick coat and was able to survive for a long time in the frozen water before rescuers got there. Generally, people or dogs only have minutes before deadly hypothermia sets in.

Depending on the dog breed, a dog could survive in ice cold water longer than a person could. So if your dog falls through an frozen pond or lake, call for help immediately. Don’t try to rescue a dog from a frozen pond by yourself as you could get trapped as well.

Please be safe this winter!

Click to read – Andover Firefighters Rescue Dog from Frozen Pond

Click to read – Border Guards Rescue Dog from Frozen Pond (The story which goes along with the video above.)

Another video of a dog being rescued from a frozen pond below:

Practicing Pet Safety for the Holidays

December 13, 2011

There is so much going on around Christmas time. Things may even get a little chaotic. But don’t forget about your dog or cat. Be sure to practice pet safety for the holidays by being aware of and reducing certain dangers.

Christmas Tree
The Christmas tree itself probably isn’t much of a danger. Just be careful your dog or cat doesn’t knock it down. Cats may like to climb the tree. The ornaments on the Christmas tree could be an issue with your pet. If you have a pet, it is probably not a good idea to have food like popcorn string decorating your tree. If your dog likes to chew, keep tinsel, ornaments, and Christmas lights out of his reach. Be especially careful of glass ornaments. Cats and dogs alike may try to play with them and hurt themselves.

Holiday Decor
Plants like poinsettia, holly, and mistletoe are poisonous. Consider imitation plants instead or keep the plants out of reach of your pets. Other holiday decor which could be dangerous is candles. A dog with a wagging tail may accidentally knock over a lit candle and a cat may accidentally walk by a lit candle and catch his tail on fire. Also be careful of holiday decor which may be enticing to your pet as a toy. Cats love to play and although there may not be much danger in that, some decor can get broken and cut someone. Small children may pick up what your cat knocked over. Dogs may mistake some decor, such as stuffed snowmen or santas, as chew toys.

Christmas Presents
Keep small Christmas presents out of reach. Cats may play with them and unintentionally break the gift. Dogs may chew them. Especially keep stockings with candy and small toys out of reach. Chocolate is poisonous to dogs and other candy may upset his stomach. Small toys may be mistaken as chew toys. Your dog may accidentally ingest one and choke or get it lodged in his intestines which may require an emergency surgery to remove it.

Christmas Dinner
Much holiday food is not good for your pet. Do not give your dog turkey or ham bones. Other holiday foods may have spices and fats which will upset your dog’s stomach. Cookies and other sweets could also upset your dog’s stomach. Chocolate is poisonous to dogs and macadamia nuts may be as well. Also, if you serve hors d’oeurves for a Christmas party, be sure all the toothpicks are picked up and thrown away. Or don’t use toothpicks at all. This could be very bad for your dog if he tries to chew one. And one last thing about holiday food – be sure to throw leftovers and bones in the outside trash or in a trash can which your dog can’t get into.

Holiday Visitors
The people you invite to your home probably are not a danger to your pets. Otherwise you wouldn’t have invited them, right? But with all the visitors going in and out, they may not be used to pets and may accidentally let them out. Or they may accidentally leave a door open. It only takes a moment for a pet to slip through and go outside to explore. Be sure your guests are all aware of where the pets are and are not allowed. Let your guests know about any issues, such as a dog liking to bolt and not coming when called or a cat being sneaky and squeezing out the door. If you know that one of your pets has this issue, consider keeping him confined to certain areas of the house only. For example, use a pet gate to keep him away from the entryway to the front door. Also make sure your pets are wearing their collars and id tags for in case they do get out.

Young children may also be a danger to pets and vice versa. Make sure children and pets are supervised. Young children may not understand that they are doing something to hurt your pet. If your pet growls or gives warning, a child may not understand what that means and it could lead to the child being bitten.

So for a quick re-cap, beware of holiday items which your pet may break, chew, or knock over. Be careful about your pet eating poisonous holiday plants, candy, or other holiday foods. And make sure your pets are secured indoors and are supervised with children. Puppies and kittens can be especially vulnerable since they have not had much training yet and may be enticed by all the new things and new people around.

Be safe and have a Merry Christmas!

Thanksgiving Special – Food Harmful to Dogs

November 22, 2011

 

Food Harmful to Dogs

Everyone is getting more stuffed than the turkey this Thanksgiving. Everyone, that is, except the family dog. It’s tempting to spoil him on this special day, but you have to be careful with what kind of food you give him. Check out this blog from our Pet Auto Safety.com website for holiday food which could be harmful to your dog – No Turkey Bones About It – Food Harmful to Dogs.


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