Posts Tagged ‘dog safety tips’

Boom! Dog Safety Tips for the 4th of July

June 30, 2012

Although my Maya is in the spirit of the 4th of July, it is still not a good idea to let her go watch the fireworks.

This is a repost of our 4th of July safety post from last year:

People love fireworks.  The colorful lights exploding in the night sky dazzles our eyes.  The explosion excites us as we thank God that we live in the United States of America.  But despite how much we love fireworks, most dogs do not like them at all.

Every year after the 4th of July the shelters get a higher volume of lost dogs.  Lost dog posters can be seen in the park and the neighborhoods.  Some dogs escape their yard as they try to run in fright from the terrible noise of the fireworks.  Many other dogs were at the park with their owners at the fireworks when they got away.  Some dogs might eventually find their way home thanks to a kind stranger or animal control, but others may never make it back.

When you go to watch fireworks this year, be sure to leave your dog safe and secure at home.  If possible, keep them in a secure area inside the house.  A dog in the back yard may jump or dig out in order to escape the noise.  Or if he is on a chain he may break the it, slip out of his collar, or hurt himself trying to break out of it.  If your dog is crate trained, keep him inside the house and inside his crate.  If he is not crate trained, keep him in a quiet room.  If possible, keep him in a room with no accessible windows – such as the bathroom.

You can also help your dog by turning on some familiar noise such as the radio or television.  And even if your dog is indoors, make sure he is wearing his collar or tags.  A desperate dog just might be able to find a way out. I have heard of dogs breaking out of windows, going through air ducts, and even managing to open an unlocked door. Tags will help to bring them home. If you find a dog this year, contact the local animal shelter and humane society. Post in the classified ads of your local newspaper. Post online too. Craig’s list is a popular place to post online. Leave fliers at local neighborhood centers and notify local residents.

If you don’t want your pet to be left out of the festivities, take your pet to the park for the 4th of July picnic.  But please leave take him home before the fireworks! Enjoy the Independence Day celebration and come home to a safe and happy pet.

4th of July Safety for Your Dog

July 2, 2011
4th of July Safety for Your Dog

4th of July Safety for Your Dog

People love fireworks.  The colorful lights exploding in the night sky dazzles our eyes.  The explosion excites us as we thank God that we live in the United States of America.  But despite how much we love fireworks, most dogs do not like them at all.

Every year after the 4th of July the shelters get a higher volume of lost dogs.  Lost dog posters can be seen in the park and the neighborhoods.  Some dogs escape their yard as they try to run in fright from the terrible noise of the fireworks.  Many other dogs were at the park with their owners at the fireworks when they got away.  Some dogs might eventually find their way home thanks to a kind stranger or animal control, but others may never make it back.

When you go to watch fireworks this year, be sure to leave your dog safe and secure at home.  If possible, keep them in a secure area inside the house.  A dog in the back yard may jump or dig out in order to escape the noise.  Or if he is on a chain he may break the it, slip out of his collar, or hurt himself trying to break out of it.  If your dog is crate trained, keep him inside the house and inside his crate.  If he is not crate trained, keep him in a quiet room.  If possible, keep him in a room with no accessible windows – such as the bathroom.

You can also help your dog by turning on some familiar noise such as the radio or television.  And even if your dog is indoors, make sure he is wearing his collar or tags.  A desperate dog just might be able to find a way out. I have heard of dogs breaking out of windows, going through air ducts, and even managing to open an unlocked door. Tags will help to bring them home. If you find a dog this year, contact the local animal shelter and humane society. Post in the classified ads of your local newspaper. Post online too. Craig’s list is a popular place to post online. Leave fliers at local neighborhood centers and notify local residents.

If you don’t want your pet to be left out of the festivities, take your pet to the park for the 4th of July picnic.  But please leave take him home before the fireworks! Enjoy the Independence Day celebration and come home to a safe and happy pet.

Family Barbecue With the Dog – Safety Tips

May 31, 2010

Having a barbecue can be a lot of fun. Whether it is just your family or extended family and friends, it is important to keep your pets safety in mind. Here are a few dog safety tips for a family barbecue:

By far, the most important tip is to keep your dog away from the barbecue grill. This holds true for children as well. Make sure your grill is away from where the dogs and kids play, as well as at least 10 feet away from the house. You wouldn’t want anyone to knock over the grill and hurt themselves or accidentally set something on fire.

Make sure your dog stays away from the food. Keep the food out of reach. Too much fatty foods that your dog is not used to eating can make them sick. And certain foods can be dangerous for your dogs to eat – food like chicken and pork bones, chocolate (like chocolate cupcakes and such), onions, and some nuts. Ask your guests not to give your dog any scraps. That can be difficult so perhaps put together a little dish of special dog treats that your guests can give them.

Also, make sure the young kids are not walking around with their food. Your dog may take the opportunity to steal it. Not only could your dog eat something bad for them, but accidental biting could also occur – not to mention how unhappy the child may be when the dog eats their ice cream cone!

Watch out for over-activity. A dog distracted by lots of fun and games may forget to drink water. Keep plenty of water available and check out our blog “Spring Water Safety for You and Your Dog” about how to look for signs of heat exhaustion.

Keep the kids toys picked up when not in use. Some toys can be chewed into small pieces and ingested by your dog. Intestinal blockage could occur which could lead to injury or death. Also, keep plates, plastic forks, cups, and other items you find at a barbecue away from the dogs. Keep basting brush, tongs, and fork out of reach. Even a dog who is not generally inclined to chew may be temped by these things. Be sure to put trash in a lidded trash can.

Have your dog wear sunscreen. If needed, put a little on their ears and nose to prevent sunburn. Make sure the sunscreen is non-toxic.

Have fun and keep safe!

Easter Candy Safety for Your Dogs

March 30, 2010
Candy may be more prevalent in your household during holidays such as Halloween, Christmas, or Easter. So if you have pets, it is important to keep candy out of their reach. Easter is an especial time to be cautious as you may have hidden candy around your house for the kids to find. You wouldn’t want your dog to find any by accident.
 
While candy, for the most part, may be harmless to your pet, too much could cause upset stomach, vomiting, and/or diarrhea. Even little bits of candy given over a long period of time could lead to obesity or even Type II Diabetes – Yes, dogs can get diabetes too.
 
Not only is candy bad for a dog’s health, certain candy such as chocolate could be deadly. Dark chocolate is even more potentially harmful than milk chocolate. But if your dog ingests any form of chocolate, it is best to consult your vet immediately for proper treatment.
 
Eating candy wrappers or basket grass could also be harmful to your pet. Such things could cause intestinal blockage in your dog’s intestines, which in turn could lead to death.
  
Be careful of your dog eating hard boiled eggs as well. While the eggs and the egg shells may be relatively harmless, there is a danger of choking. This applies to the plastic eggs with hidden goodies as well. If your dog happens to eat a hard boiled egg with its shell without choking on it, he is probably okay. But it wouldn’t hurt to contact your vet just to make sure. However, if your dog eats a plastic egg without choking, get your dog to the vet immediately as an object of this size is very likely to cause blockage in your dog’s intestinal tract.
 
To keep your dog from getting into any candy or other Easter stuff, keep it out of your dog’s reach or in cupboards which have child safety latches. If you hide candy and other Easter stuff for your children, keep the dog in their crate, in another room, or outside during these activities (or inside if the Easter hunt for the kids is outside). Make a list of how many and where you hid each item so that you can be sure all are found before you allow your dog back into that area.
 
To have fun with your dog as well as with your children during Easter, hide dog biscuits. But keep your dog’s event separate from your children’s. Your children will have just as much fun helping your dog find their treats as they did finding their own eggs and candy.
 
And the final Easter candy safety advise we have is that you keep your dog at home when you go to an Easter event. Candy and other Easter stuff will be everywhere and your dog may find something a child missed. Or someone who doesn’t know the dangers of chocolate to dogs may accidentally give your dog a deadly treat.
 
Easter is supposed to be a special event for your family. Practice these safety tips and everyone, including your dog, will have a good, safe, and happy holiday.